Saturday, August 11, 2012

LOCAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK BRANDED ‘NIMBY’S CHARTER’.

            Northumberland Labour Group


                                                                                        
Ian Swithenbank, Chairperson
Grant Davey, Leader
Val Tyler, Deputy
Robert Arckless, Secretary

County Hall
Morpeth
Northumberland NE61 2EF
Telephone (01670) 533000
Fax (01670) 533072




Press Release


LOCAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK BRANDED ‘NIMBY’S CHARTER’.
Liberal and Tory planning proposals will ‘force tough choices on communities’

Liberal proposals in Northumberland to create a development framework have been branded ‘a nimby’s charter’ by a group of Labour politicians. The council’s Local Development Framework which has been year’s in the devising is being largely supported by the main opposition group, the Conservatives but fears have been raised that the framework will place ‘undue pressure on communities like Ponteland’ by creating an unsustainable ‘green belt’ around Morpeth.

The current LDF does not support anywhere across the county apart from outer Ponteland, Blyth, Cramlington and Cambois and this may mean the creation of ‘super applications’ such as the 2500 homes proposed for the outskirts of Ponteland. Labour favour a more evenly spread development framework across the whole county seeking to boost the population to at least 450,000. The Northumberland LDF is based around the creation of a huge green belt of national park proportions around Morpeth, protecting the town from expansion and growth.

Northumberland Labour Group Leader Grant Davey said,

"After four years of work on the new LDF, it’s a pity that the Lib Dem council and some Conservatives have chosen short term political advantage rather than a sustainable policy that puts residents in the driving seat. They have chosen to take the towns, villages and settlements across the county and bundle them in such a way as to block any developments such as affordable housing and effectively ensuring they couldn't take place. This isn’t a planning policy for the 21st century, it’s more like a hark back to the categories of the 1960’s and the long term problems for communities still being experienced today’.


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